The Rule of Thirds

Archive for July, 2007

Oracle Submits Identity Governance Framework to openLiberty.org

Posted by pridham on July 27, 2007

Liberty Alliance, the global identity consortium working to build a more trusted Internet for consumers, governments and businesses worldwide, today announced two key milestones for the Identity Governance Framework (IGF). Today, industry leaders submitted IGF to openLiberty.org for open source development of IGF implementations. Liberty Alliance also announced the ratification of market requirements documentation (MRD) for IGF and the commencement of technical specification work. With today’s news, developers, system integrators and organizations in every sector can begin planning IGF deployments referencing the publicly available MRD and building IGF applications based on the open source APIs collaboratively developed at openLiberty.org.

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Two days after the deluge

Posted by pridham on July 22, 2007

The family managed to get to Stratford-on-Avon after being stranded at home since Friday. There are serious floods in the opposite direction to Stratford (Evesham and Tewkesbury), but I hope the worst is over considering that Rebecca is due today.Photos from SOA

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The Merging of SOA and Web 2.0

Posted by pridham on July 20, 2007

Dan Cahoon was looking for a way to streamline staffing operations at tax company H&R Block, the nation’s largest seasonal employer. Rather than use traditional desktop-based software for the job, the senior systems architect at H&R Block was able to deliver SOA-connected AJAX portlets to more than 12,000 branch offices for temporary work spaces to meet the company’s staffing needs.

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Outsource to achieve your service goals

Posted by pridham on July 20, 2007

Organisations often embark on outsourcing with the aim of improving service performance and driving innovation. During the sales phase, service providers will often boast of their “transformational” outsourcing services, and will describe how they can deliver improvements and facilitate innovation, resulting in better service levels.

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Pitching Agile to Senior Management

Posted by pridham on July 20, 2007

A common lament amongst developers who want to adopt agile techniques is that they don’t know how to convince senior management to let them do it. Until recently, agile software development was on the left-hand side of Moore’s technology adoption chasm where it is relatively easy to convince people to try new ideas—often a 30-second elevator pitch was enough to get the go-ahead. Now that we’re on the right-hand side of the chasm and dealing with early majority and late adopters, the elevator pitch at best might get you permission to give a detailed presentation sometime next quarter. The rules of the game have changed and many of us are struggling to adapt.

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SAP Sees Bright Future in Midmarket

Posted by pridham on July 20, 2007

Code-named A1S, the mid0market suite has been in the works at SAP since the beginning of the 2007, when SAP CEO Henning Kagermann outlined the company’s plans to invest between $414 million and $552 million (300 to 400 million euros) over eight quarters to build up a new midmarket business; nearly $70 million (50 million euros) of that war chest has already been spent in the first two quarters of 2007.

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CIOs must be act like venture capatalists, says Gartner

Posted by pridham on July 20, 2007

CIOs need to adopt a venture-capitalist approach to IT if they are to remain relevant in the prevailing climate of economic growth, according to Dave Aron, vice-president and research director for Gartner executive programs.

This involves getting to know the growth plans of the business intimately, determining how to use the resources within IT to contribute directly to that growth, and then consulting with business to shape the demands on IT to ensure delivery of growth and not merely support.

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Bye bye SaaS, hello PaaS

Posted by pridham on July 20, 2007

Software as a Service (SaaS) isn’t dead, but it could soon be overtaken by Platform as a Service (PaaS), according to SaaS pioneer Salesforce.com. “The first generation of SaaS was about providing applications such as customer relationship management (CRM) and email packaged as services. With Summer ’07 we are taking this to the next level and delivering a platform with tools and services for the developer,” Salesforce.com chief marketing officer Clarence So says.

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Compliance strategies for SMBs

Posted by pridham on July 20, 2007

Compliance doesn’t begin and end with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX). Small and medium-sized businesses (SMBs) must also keep up with the Payment Card Industry’s (PCI) security standards, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and numerous other regulations and guidelines. It’s a tall order, but it’s one SMBs must face in order to protect their customers and stay in line with standards set by the IT industry as well as the government. This IT Management Guide offers news, insights and resources to help SMBs stay on top of their compliance responsibilities.

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Google voted most significant e-commerce development

Posted by pridham on July 19, 2007

Google has been voted the most significant e-commerce development of the past decade in a poll carried out by the Software and Information Industry Association (SIAA).

1. Google (Sept. 1998)
Google did more to fundamentally change the way we use the Internet than any other event in the last 10 years. The simple search engine that began with a couple of smart guys is now used by 30% of Internet users to help find precisely what we’re looking for online, map our world, create simple yet highly targeted advertisements and much more. Americans conducted 6.9 billion searches online in February 2007 and nearly half of those were on Google

2. Broadband Penetration of US Internet Users Reaches 50% (June 2004)
When the Information Superhighway first opened, it felt more like an old dirt road – until broadband released its full potential. Available and affordable broadband took longer than expected to arrive – but when it finally reached 50% penetration in 2004, a milestone was reached that signaled a dramatic change in how commerce gets done online, how consumers use and share content, and how the world communicates. It took broadband roughly 4 years to reach 50% – but it is estimated that it will reach 90% penetration of Internet users by the end of the year.

3. eBay Auctions (Launched Sept. 1997)
eBay showed us that the Internet could be used to reach massive national — and even global — markets better and faster than ever before. The launch empowered hundreds of thousands of power sellers to quit their day jobs and work exclusively online. Individuals could also compete directly with each other in ways unimaginable in a physical market.

4. Amazon.com (IPO May 1997)
Amazon showed the world what an online store would look like and made online shopping popular through its ease of use and wide selection. Amazon’s public offering told the worldthat online commerce is legitimate and here to stay. It signaled the increasingly important role that e-commerce would play in the American economy.

5. Google Ad Words (2000)
Key word advertising has become the biggest online advertising vehicle, representing 40 percent of that market and $6.8 billion in revenue. Keyword ads are the simplest and most cost-effective mechanism to reach targeted audiences, affordable to even the smallest business.

6. Open Standards (HTML 4.0 released – 1997)
The standards for the web embodied in HTML are overseen by the World Wide Web Consortium, which is not controlled by any company or government. The formats are open, well documented and designed to work with different software and hardware. It has probably been the most influential and important data standard in the history of publishing. Open standards can grow an entire industry, leaving more room and more opportunity for everyone.

7. Wi-Fi (802.11 launched – 1997)
From desk to board room to beach, connectivity is never lost and communication is never delayed. The development of Wi-Fi removed the limitations of desktops and cables and shifted focus toward mobile solutions. Wireless Internet enabled road warriors to be connected anywhere in industries like real estate, transportation, travel, and financial services.

8. User-Generated Content (YouTube 2005)
Right now it is impossible to say what the full ramifications of the “citizen journalist” era will be – but the dramatic impact of YouTube tells us more than any other recent development. At first a playground for kids with video cameras, YouTube is now the embodiment of Web 2.0. It is a must-be-seen place for presidential candidates, a battleground in the copyright wars, a vital distribution point for major media – and most of all, a place where anyone…absolutely anyone…can deliver a message to the world.

9. iTunes (2001)
In the aftermath of Napster and the P2P battles, iTunes legitimized the digital music industry, revolutionizing the music industry. The importance of CDs declined while music as digital content grew, leading to developments in everything from Digital Rights Management software to increased bandwidth use. Today, more than US$2 billion worth of music was sold online or through mobile phones in 2006 (trade revenues), almost doubling the market in the last year. Digital sales now account for around 10% of the music market

10. BlackBerry (1999)
The BlackBerry makes communication instantaneous, and mobile. A comprehensive communications device creates a new mobile business culture. Giving road warriors the freedom to move to any location and maintain connectivity increases cooperation and efficiency. By having the web in the palm of your hand, Internet connected devices enable ecommerce anywhere, anytime.

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